Heels to Laces Menu

Viewing all items for tag massage

Permalink:

Foam Rolling – Why It’s So Beneficial!

There are many different stretching exercises out there and all have similar goals: increase flexibility, improve performance and reduce muscle soreness.  One of the more recent and effective additions to the world of stretching is foam rolling.  Due to a recent injury, I have spent a lot of time rolling and learning first hand about its benefits and I have been amazed at the results.

tri42_a

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

What is Foam Rolling?

Foam rollers are cylinders about 6 inches in diameter and usually about 36 inches long that you lie on and roll over your muscles to help to loosen tight muscles. Foam rolling actually increases circulation so the connective tissue and muscles receive more oxygen and water than stretching alone.  In addition, foam rolling is a form of self-myofascial release that acts similarly to massage. Meaning not only do you get the benefits of working out muscle knots and tightness, but you also get the same reduction in stress releasing hormones and improved mood and relaxation that you get from a massage.  Some call it the ‘poor man’s massage’.

A recent study published in the Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research documented the benefits of foam rolling before a workout.  The study tracked 2 groups of active people: one group used a foam roller before working out and the other group did not.  The group that used the rollers not only felt less sore after their workouts, they also felt that the workouts were not as difficult.

Foam rolling is not only beneficial for those who work out, it is also great for anyone who sits for long periods of time.  Long bouts of sitting are not good for our bodies (that is a whole other blog topic!) but for most of us, it can’t be avoided.  Foam rolling is also an excellent way to reverse the harmful effects of long-term sitting.

Tips of How and When to Roll:

  • How to roll.  Either find a trigger point (painful spot) and apply pressure, or roll along the muscle (like a massage). A combination of both usually works best.
  • Roll before and after a workout. 
  • Hydrate before you roll.  In general, hydrated tissue is resilient and more susceptible to the benefits of rolling while pliable dehydrated tissue is glued-down and sticky.
  • Do it slowly.  You want slow and purposeful movements.  When you hit a painful area, stay on it – that is where you need to focus.
  • Move in multiple directions. It’s not just up-and-down; muscles and fascia attach at different angles and even in spirals, so roll in different directions.
  • Make it a daily habit.  Even if you aren’t at the gym, make a point of rolling those muscles.  Think of it like flossing – it is daily maintenance.
  • Don’t foam roll on joints.

Personally, foam rolling is the single best thing I have done to combat my injuries.  The benefit is immediate; with each rolling session, I feel noticeable improvement.  I plan to make foam rolling a permanent part of my daily routine in hopes of not only speeding up my recovery, but reducing my chance for future injuries.

To leave a comment on this article or any other blog entry, please fill in the “Leave a Comment” box under each blog entry on our site: Heels to Laces

  • Thanks for leaving a comment, please keep it clean. HTML allowed is strong, code and a href.

    Comment moderation is enabled, no need to resubmit any comments posted.

Permalink:

It’s Not Just a Luxury

Last week I had the pleasure of meeting a woman named Helga. She was my masseuse. She was in her 70’s and one of the strongest, healthiest, wisest women I have ever met.

In a matter of an hour, she taught me life philosophies, including not taking things so seriously and taking care of your body as a top priority. She believes women take too much time taking care of others, and not enough time taking care of themselves.  And guilt is over-rated.

Working for many spas in my marketing career, I knew the importance of rejuvenating your body and healing, but I always looked at treatments as a luxury and felt massage2so guilty when I did indulge. Helga reiterated to me the importance of massage and how many cultures require family members to massage themselves daily to ensure their bodies functions optimally.

For the first time, it really resonated with me that massage may not just be a luxury, but a necessity. Massage has been a healing technique since ancient civilizations.

What does massage do for you?

Massage is the manipulation of layers of muscle and connective tissue using various techniques. It enhances muscle function, aids in healing, decreases muscle reflex activity and promotes relaxation and well-being. Specifically it can help:

  • Alleviate low-back pain and improve range of motion.
  • Enhance immunity by activating the body’s natural defense system.
  • Exercise and stretch weak, tight or atrophied muscles.
  • Improve circulation by pumping oxygen and nutrients into tissues and vital organs.
  • Help athletes prepare for or recover from strenuous activity.
  • Increase joint flexibility.
  • Lessen depression and anxiety.
  • Relieve pain and migraines by releasing endorphins – the body’s natural painkiller.
  • Promote tissue regeneration to reduce scar tissue and stretch marks.
  • Assist with shorter, easier labor for expectant mothers.

My advice? Make an appointment for your next massage and consider scheduling them monthly. Dare I say I have appointments for 3 this month?? That’s a first.

Just a reminder…Skin Deep Salon & Spa is one of our discounted favorites. You receive a 10% discount when you show your Heels to Laces VIP discount card.  Another favorite masseuse is Sharon Priore – she works out of the Summit Y: slpriore@yahoo.com.

If you have other recommendations, please share them by adding a comment to this post.

To leave a comment on this article or any other blog entry, please fill in the “Leave a Comment” box under each blog entry on our site: Heels to Laces

  • lisa

    Love a good massage.

  • Lisa

    Thanks for the great tips!

  • Thanks for leaving a comment, please keep it clean. HTML allowed is strong, code and a href.

    Comment moderation is enabled, no need to resubmit any comments posted.

close
Facebook IconTwitter Icon